Follow Binoculars Blog:

Monthly Archives: January 2007

31 Jan

There will appear four planets on the western horizon right after the sunset in early February.The first one, the closest and most likely the easiest to observe is Neptune. 60 degrees up and south you’ll find not only Neptune, but Mercury, Uranus and Venus also. The easiest from all these planets to see is Venus, so it’s better to start with it, and then move on to other ones. All three of these planets are in the constellation Aquarius.There are more to see with your astromonical binoculars or observation binoculars or whatever you have at home. So get them out …

Continue reading

31 Jan

Steiner is bringing out the new Peregrine XP, a premium binocular that features 44mm objective lenses and 25mm ocular lenses to grab more light than you’d get with binoculars featuring the typical 42mm objective lens setup. The company is using a new water-repellent Nano coating for the lenses, which are housed in a lightweight, waterproof magnesium body that’s shockproof and submersible. Peregrine XPs have an ergonomic design that incorporates a gel-filled grip and thumb pad embedded in the forest-green armor coating. Available in 8X or 10X, they have twist-up ocular barrels and profiled eyecups.…

Continue reading

27 Jan

Unless you’re a penguin, it’s unlikely you did much sky watching last week. If you want to see a very easy to find target, extremely bright and shining planet, when the sky darkens, look southwest. And you’ll see it –Venus! It a can’t-miss sight!Take your binoculars out of your closet, for example, I like compact binoculars and look about 10 degrees lower right of Venus – you’ll find Mercury. If you happen to be using an astronomical binoculars, you should see it about 2.5 fields from Venus. And don’t forget that Mercury will be much dimmer and more golden comparing …

Continue reading

26 Jan

Do you like watching the night sky? Or maybe you are fascinated with the opportunity of bird watching? Are you in the middle of deciding what type of binoculars you need for your application? Do you need help with guiding you and explaining you how to buy, what to buy and where?

If you look at the Milky Way with your astronomical binoculars, you’ll see hundreds of stars in your field of view that aren’t visible without the binoculars. If, however, you train your observation binoculars on the area above Fomalhaut, you won’t see more stars than you do with …

Continue reading

25 Jan

I’ve recently bought a new thing for me – a digital camera binoculars just recently, and here is what I learned about its capabilities and things you can do with it.You can’t imagine, but camera binoculars have many uses. You can use it for sky and bird watching, during picnics and even trekking. If you are a researcher, you are definitely welcome to use it for your needs too. It’s still a comparatively new piece of technology and not yet widely popular. As you can quess, a camera binocular is a binocular with built in digital camera. Camera binoculars are …

Continue reading

24 Jan

I will tell you about the observatory on Mount Graham in Arizona. Well, It’s got one of the biggest Binocular Telescope. Scientists will be studying the formation of solar systems through this telescope. This Binocular device receives PLANETQUEST, the second of two essential telescope mirrors. The size of this mirror is 8.4-meter (27.6 foot) in diameter. The place where these giant binoculars are located is now under construction, so you won’t be able to visit this place for another couple of months.But anyways, the combined mirror surface area will be able to catch the light of planets trillions of miles …

Continue reading

22 Jan

When I gaze up on a clear night sky either with my astronomy binoculars or even without them, I feel so insignificant. I’m sure that our earliest ancestors admired these wonders much more than we do now.Have you ever thought if there are any other civilizations out there? Maybe they have their own lives? Maybe they are smarter and have more interesting lives than we do here?

Our Universe contains countless other solar systems that are billions of years older than our world. Our sun turns out to be merely one rather ordinary star among hundreds of billions in a …

Continue reading

19 Jan

5. Start noticing patterns among the stars. Have you ever thought how we know about all the stars, comets, planets, constellations in the sky? I’m sure that our ancestors were doing the same thing while sitting around a campfire. They were attentive and kept an eye on everything. So, start today and try to find a noticeable star pattern, and then look for another one nearby. Notice straight lines of stars, triangles and curves. Make up your own stories about constellations as our ancestors did. Enjoy it and have fun!6. Try to find local astro-friends. If you are a college …

Continue reading

19 Jan

Here are the tips for those of you who want to feel themselves as a part of a bigger picture, for people with a sense of curiosity and wonder. Even if you haven’t tried it before, take a second and you will like it. Make a difference in you life and create a link between you and the night starry sky…1. Look up above you. Most of us go through life looking either straight ahead or down. But you need to look up to see all the beauty around you, the sky, and the stars. When you stand outside at …

Continue reading

18 Jan

There has been a lot of rumors and buzz around McNaught Comet since it was discovered just last year. Since it got closer to the sun and became brighter, the word was already out – the comet was very magic and special.During morning hours these days you are able to observe the McNaught comet passing by, if you get your astronomical binoculars. In order to see the bright object with the tail blown by sunny wind, you need to get up at sunrise, go out and face east with your Long Range Observation Binoculars. And if you draw a line …

Continue reading